Nguyen - Web Design-Period 2 Assignments

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Past Assignments

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(E12) Adding Value to the School Through Branding and Communication in Google Classroom

(E12) Adding Value to the School Through Branding and Communication

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(E10) Layout and Composition in Google Classroom

(E10) Layout and Composition

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(E9) Typography of a Magazine in Google Classroom

(E9) Typography of a Magazine

Search for a Magazine cover you find appealing. Copy and paste the image below. Give a brief paragraph (5-7 sentences) analysis of the magazine cover. Be sure to use at least 4 of the 7 vocabulary words to write your analysis.

VOCABULARY: serif, sans serif, display font, hierarchy, leading, tracking, kerning

** EXTRA CREDIT ** 

Analyze the typography of an additional magazine cover.

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(E8) TYPOGRAPHY DO-NOW - Your Name in Google Classroom

(E8) TYPOGRAPHY DO-NOW - Your Name

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(E6) Design Fundamentals in Google Classroom

(E6) Design Fundamentals

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(E4) Wireframing Project in Google Classroom

(E4) Wireframing Project

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(Extra Credit) Spring Break Photo Log in Google Classroom

(Extra Credit) Spring Break Photo Log

DIRECTIONS:

1) Go outside every single day of your Spring Break (even if it's just outside your building/home for 5 min).

2) Snap a photo or selfie of being outside for that day. Be creative! Time stamp the photo or have a sticky note or letter board of the date and/or time.

3) Upload the photos to this assignment. 10 points for each photo (90 possible points). Leave a private comment and briefly describe what you did that day outside.

+30 points to make it into a Google Slide and +30 if you present it to the class!
150 points possible

GO OUTSIDE!!! ENJOY YOUR SPRING BREAK!!!

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(E3) Sitemap in Google Classroom

(E3) Sitemap

Go to the Newtown Website. Create a sitemap of the website of 15+ pages.

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(D9) UX Design Portfolio Website Interview in Google Classroom

(D9) UX Design Portfolio Website Interview

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(D8) UX Design Mini-lesson Notes in Google Classroom

(D8) UX Design Mini-lesson Notes

Listen or review the following mini-lesson with accompanying slides.

Create notes of the lesson and complete the task.

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(D4) Blog Post #2 in Google Classroom

(D4) Blog Post #2

Blog Post #2

Write a blog post by following the guidelines from the article, "What Makes a Good Blog Post?" and the "Internal & External Links" assignment. Points for this assignment are calculated based on those blog post features.

Submit a link to your post on this assignment page. Thanks!

Post Guidelines

- Your post should be at least 500 words
- Hook Your Readers With a Great Opening
- Write Like You Talk
- Make It Scannable
- Include headings
- Include Bullet Points
- Use Images for Visual Engagement
- Include a Compelling Call to Action
- Add a Featured Image
- Include 2-5 external links
- Include 1-2 internal links

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(D3) Internal & External Links in Google Classroom

(D3) Internal & External Links

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(D2) Keyword Research for Your WordPress Blog in Google Classroom

(D2) Keyword Research for Your WordPress Blog

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(D1) Edpuzzle - What is a Blog? in Google Classroom

(D1) Edpuzzle - What is a Blog?

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(C9) Best time to public a blog post in Google Classroom

(C9) Best time to public a blog post

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(C10) Write a Blog Post in Google Classroom

(C10) Write a Blog Post

Write a blog post by following the guidelines from the article, "What Makes a Good Blog Post?" See attachment for article and Google Slides. Be sure to follow steps 5-9! Points for this assignment are calculated based on those blog post features. Your post should be about a 5 min read.

Submit a link to your post on this assignment page. Thanks!

HOW TO WRITE A GOOD BLOG POST: 10 EXPERT TIPS
1) Choose a Good Topic
2) Do Your Research
3) Take Notes and Start an Outline
4) Hook Your Readers With a Great Opening
5) Write Like You Talk
6) Make It Scannable
7) Use Images for Visual Engagement
8) Include a Compelling Call to Action
9) Add a Featured Image
10) Publish at the Right Time

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(C8) Article: How to Write a Good Blog Post in Google Classroom

(C8) Article: How to Write a Good Blog Post

Read the following article. Create a simple 1 page cheat sheet for yourself on the tips provided in the article. Attach your cheat sheet to this assignment page.

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(C8) Article: How to Write a Good Blog Post (5-10 min) in Google Classroom

(C8) Article: How to Write a Good Blog Post (5-10 min)

Read the following article. Create a simple 1 page cheat sheet for yourself on the tips provided in the article. Attach your cheat sheet to this assignment page.

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(C6) Blogging Ideas in Google Classroom

(C6) Blogging Ideas

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(C5) New Year’s Reflection and Goals in Google Classroom

(C5) New Year’s Reflection and Goals

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(C3) WYSIWYG in Google Classroom

(C3) WYSIWYG

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(C2) Best CMS for Blogs in Google Classroom

(C2) Best CMS for Blogs

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(C1) Web design for beginners: a simple (but complete) guide in Google Classroom

(C1) Web design for beginners: a simple (but complete) guide

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Edpuzzle - What is FTP? | GoDaddy in Google Classroom

Edpuzzle - What is FTP? | GoDaddy

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Edpuzzle - HTTP and HTML | Internet 101  in Google Classroom

Edpuzzle - HTTP and HTML | Internet 101

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(ExCred) Web Design MP2 Study Guide in Google Classroom

(ExCred) Web Design MP2 Study Guide

Jot down notes for each key concept.
Extra Credit - 25 points

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(B13) Wellbeing & Mental Health Self-assessment in Google Classroom

(B13) Wellbeing & Mental Health Self-assessment

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(B12) MP2 Web Design Quiz in Google Classroom

(B12) MP2 Web Design Quiz

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(B11) HTML Sources in Google Classroom

(B11) HTML Sources

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(EXCred) The Business Side of Thanksgiving in Google Classroom

(EXCred) The Business Side of Thanksgiving

Complete for extra credit for the course

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(B10) FTP Project: Uploading my Webpage in Google Classroom

(B10) FTP Project: Uploading my Webpage

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(B9) FTP Project: HTML 2 - Checking your HTML in Google Classroom

(B9) FTP Project: HTML 2 - Checking your HTML

ACTIVITY: Checking your HTML (Try the following activity once you’ve read this document)
1) Go to W3C: Markup Validation Services
2) Click the 3rd tab “Validate by Direct Input”
3) Go back to assignment (B8) and copy and paste the HTML you created into the validator. Then press “Check.”
4) See if you need to make any small revisions to your HTML (example, closing a tag, etc).
5) Add the lang attribute to your HTML tag.
6) Add the alt attribute to your img element.
7) Run your new HTML in the HTML Editor
8) When you’re finished, SAVE your HTML and submit the link to this assignment page.

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(B8) FTP Project: HTML in Google Classroom

(B8) FTP Project: HTML

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(EX) Cheer Someone Up in Google Classroom

(EX) Cheer Someone Up

Cheer someone up right now! Look at the list of ways to cheer someone up and complete one of the tasks during class. Write about what you did and reflect on it. How it make you feel? Why should we do nice things for others? 👇

Note: This is extra credit if you came to class on 11/13/2020 and completed this on Friday.

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(B2) What is Responsive Design? (EX) in Google Classroom

(B2) What is Responsive Design? (EX)

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(A12) Web Design Quiz MP1 in Google Classroom

(A12) Web Design Quiz MP1

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(A11) Edpuzzle - What Is Web Hosting? Explained Simply | GoDaddy in Google Classroom

(A11) Edpuzzle - What Is Web Hosting? Explained Simply | GoDaddy

Video Transcript:

Hi there! In this video, you’ll learn what hosting is and we’ll identify the four types of hosting available at GoDaddy.

To make your website visible on the Web, your website’s files and data must be physically stored on a computer that is connected to the Internet. These large, high-powered computers are called web servers.

Website hosts are companies that physically house several web servers in one location, or what is sometimes referred to as a data center. In addition to housing the web servers, website hosts provide the software, security, support, and bandwidth that connects your website to the Internet.

Think of a website hosting company like a shopping center that contains several individual stores.

If you want to open a store at the shopping center, you can lease space in it and set up shop.

Just like a shopping center, website hosting companies enable you to lease space on their web servers where you can store your website files and make them available for visitors to view on the Internet.

To accommodate a wide variety of websites and customer needs, there are a variety of hosting solutions.

Hosting solutions are broadly categorized based on the amount of server space you need for your website files, and the monthly amount of bandwidth your site consumes. Bandwidth refers to the amount of data being transferred or the amount of resource usage your website requires.

Consider your shop again; suppose you sell only handmade bracelets; you have a small, unique product offering, so you don’t need, nor want to, lease the same amount of space as a big department store.

Instead, you could lease a small kiosk in the shopping center that gives you just enough space for your goods and costs far less money.

Additionally, because you’re a small shop, you don’t need a lot of extra technology or staff to help you sell your product, like a department store requires.

Between you and your mobile payment device, you have plenty of “bandwidth” to take care of your customers and don’t buy extra technology or hire more employees. Make sense?

Beyond server space and bandwidth, there are other things to consider when selecting a hosting solution. Your budget, ease of use or complexity of solution; the level of flexibility or customization the solution allows; as well as privacy and security features.

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(A10) (Continued) Beginner’s Guide: What is a Domain Name and How Do Domain in Google Classroom

(A10) (Continued) Beginner’s Guide: What is a Domain Name and How Do Domain

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(A9) Edpuzzle - IP Address and DNS in Google Classroom

(A9) Edpuzzle - IP Address and DNS

Hi. My name is Paola, and I am a software engineer at Microsoft.
Let's talk about how the internet works. My job relies on networks being able to talk with one another. But back in the 1970s, there was no standard method for this. It took the work of Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn to invent the Internetworking Protocol to make communication possible. This invention laid the groundwork for what we now call the internet.

The internet is a network of networks. It links billions of devices together all around the globe. Maybe you're connected with a laptop or a phone through wifi. But then that wifi connection connects to an Internet Service Provider, or ISP. And that ISP connects you to billions and billions of devices around the world through hundreds of thousands of networks that are all interconnected.

One thing that most people do not appreciate, is that the internet is really a design philosophy and an architecture expressed in a set of protocols. A protocol is a well-known set of rules and standards that, if all parties agree to use it, will allow them to communicate without trouble.

How the internet actually physically works is less important than the fact that this design philosophy has allowed the internet to adapt and absorb new communication technologies. This is because in order for a new technology
to use the internet in some fashion, it just needs to know which protocols to work with.

All the different devices on the internet have unique addresses. An address on the internet is just a number, similar to a phone number, or a sort of street address that's unique to each computer or device at the edge of the network.

This is similar to how most homes and businesses have a mailing address. You don't need to know a person to send them a letter in the mail, but you do need to know their address, and how to write the address properly, so the letter can be carried by the mail system
to its destination. The addressing system for computers on the internet is similar, and it forms part of one of the most important
protocols used in internet communication, simply called the Internet Protocol, or IP.

A computer's address, then, is called its IP address. Visiting a website is really just your computer asking another computer for information. Your computer sends a message to the other computer's IP address, and it also sends along its origin address
so the other computer knows where to send its response. - You may have seen an IP address. It's just a bunch of numbers.

These numbers are organized in a hierarchy. Just like a home address has a country, a city, a street, and a house number, an IP address has many parts. Just like all digital data, each of these numbers is represented in bits. Traditional IP addresses are 32 bits long, with eight bits for each part of the address. The earlier numbers usually identify the country and regional network of the device. Then come the subnetworks. And then, finally, the address of the specific device. This version of IP addressing is called IPv4. It was designed in 1973, and widely adopted in the early '80s, and provides for more than 4 billion unique addresses for devices connecting to the internet. But the internet has turned out to be much more popular than even Vint Cerf imagined, and 4 billion unique addresses won't be enough. We're now in the middle of a multi-year transition to a longer IP address format called IPv6, which uses 128 bits per address, and provides over 340 undecillion unique addresses. That's more than enough for every grain of sand on Earth to have its own IP address. - Most users never see or care about internet addresses.

A system called the Domain Name System, or DNS, associates names, like www.example.com, with the corresponding addresses. Your computer uses the DNS to look up domain names and get the associated IP address, which is used to connect your computer to the destination on the internet.

- [Voiceover] And it goes a little something like this.
- Hey, hi there. I want to go to www.code.org
- Yeah, well I don't know the IP address for that domain. Let me ask around. Hey, anyone know how to get to a... code.org?
- Yeah, I got it right here.
It's 174 dot 129
dot 14 dot 120.

- So how do we design a system for billions of device to find any one of billions of different websites? There is no way one DNS server can handle all of the requests from all devices. The answer is that DNS servers are connected in a distributed hierarchy, and are divided into zones, splitting up responsibility for the major domains such as .org, .com, .net, et cetera.

DNS was originally created to be an open and public communication protocol for government and educational institutions. Because of its openness, DNS is susceptible to cyber attacks. An example attack is DNS spoofing. That's when a hacker taps into a DNS server and changes it to match a domain name with the wrong IP address. This lets the attacker send people to one imposter website. If this happens to you, you are vulnerable for more problems because you are using that fake website as if it is real. The internet is huge, and getting bigger every day. But the Domain Name System and Internet Protocol are designed to scale, no matter how much the internet grows.

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(A8) Beginner’s Guide: What is a Domain Name and How Do Domains Work in Google Classroom

(A8) Beginner’s Guide: What is a Domain Name and How Do Domains Work

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(A7) Website Credibility in Google Classroom

(A7) Website Credibility

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(A6) Popular Types of Websites in Google Classroom

(A6) Popular Types of Websites

Read the article, “12 Popular Types of Websites You Can Create.”

Complete the Google Slides by creating 1 slide for each of the types of websites. A slide for the “eCommerce website” is already created as an examples.

In each slide, please include:

- The type of website as the header
- A brief description of the purpose of the website or key points about the website
- Example websites of that type of website
- 2+ images (one of the images can be the same image as on the article)

Feel free to decorate the background, change the fonts, and make your slides creative if you’d like. However, remember to prioritize content and completing the task before decorating.

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(E2) Personal Action Plan: Goals in Google Classroom

(E2) Personal Action Plan: Goals

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(A4) About Me in Google Classroom

(A4) About Me

Directions: Create an “About Me” page on a Google Document or Microsoft Word.

-- Write a minimum of 1 - 2 paragraphs about yourself
-- Include your work experience, education (or education goals/Post Secondary Education Goals), skills, and languages. If you don’t have work experience, include any leadership or extracurricular activities you’re involved in.
-- Include a picture of yourself. See example.
-- Once you complete your About Me, go to the “share” button and change the share settings to NYC Department of Education. (See Tutorial Video: https://youtu.be/_NTqBysU4Lk). If you created the "About Me" page on Microsoft Word, upload your file onto your Google Drive and change share settings.
-- Copy the link URL and paste it onto the "Class Comments" of this assignment page.
-- View other student’s "About Me." Make a comment on at least 2 other people’s assignment. Comments can be of “glows, “grows,” or “connections.” Please comment on a student's project who has 0 or few comments.
-- Optional/Extended: Add additional photos with cations.

See example for reference.

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(A3) Employabilities Skills Profile in Google Classroom

(A3) Employabilities Skills Profile

Please complete the following form for your Employabilities Skills Profile

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(A2) Padlet in Google Classroom

(A2) Padlet

Go to the following Padlet. Add a post to respond to the prompts.

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(A1) Self-introduction on Flipgrid in Google Classroom

(A1) Self-introduction on Flipgrid

Go to the following Flipgird link.

Introduce yourself, and tell us the story of your name. Respond to at least 1 other person's self-introduction.